Summary: The Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs released a report in March 2008 entitled International Narcotics Control Strategy Report - 2008 (INCSR-2008). This report stated that there was an increase in drug trading, and that employees in the commercial transportation industry were becoming involved.

Barbados (GOB) has signed some agreements with other Governments to fight corruption, but it does not appear that these agreements have been ratified. The Government has failed to act decisively on this issue, and the Royal Barbados Police Force (RBPF) and other agencies appear to be failing in their enforcement duties. Drug crimes are up, but arrests are way down! Bajan law enforcement agencies charged 2,551
people with drug offences in 2005, but only 242 in 2007, a decrease of 91%! What is going on?
I plotted a graph:

What is the Barbadian Government Doing to Combat Money Laundering and its associated Drug Dealing?

Quotes taken from: International Narcotics Control Strategy Report -2008

Crack cocaine & marijuana - DEA

Barbados. Barbados is a transit country for cocaine and marijuana. There has been a general increase in drugs transiting Barbados since 2004. A notable trend encountered in 2007 was the use of employees working in key commercial transportation positions, e.g. baggage handlers, FedEx, DHL to assist with drug trafficking, and the emerging trend of having cocaine soaked into clothing to avoid detection. Most of the cannabis entering Barbados is consumed locally, while local consumption of cocaine represents only five percent of the amount thought to transit the island. There is legislation that imposes recordkeeping on precursor chemicals. There were no reports of production, transit or consumption of methamphetamines in Barbados. In 2007, Government of Barbados (GOB) agencies reported seizing 228.6 kg of cocaine and 4,194 kg of marijuana. There have not been any seizures of Ecstasy since 2005, when Barbados, for the first time, confiscated 2,445 Ecstasy tablets. The GOB brought drug charges against 242 persons during 2007 – a two thirds decrease from the number of arrests made in 2006. Four major drug traffickers were arrested during this period. Total
reported drug charges in 2007 were significantly lower than the previous year. In 2007, the GOB eliminated 7,194 cannabis plants, almost triple the amount eliminated in 2006.
Editors note: Drug trafficking is increasing … baggage handlers and couriers are getting into the action … but the number of people being charged has been DRASTICALLY reduced, according to official US reports. (also see snippet at end of this post) Here are the statistics (see graph above):

  1. 2007 - 242 persons charged
  2. 2006 - 623 persons charged
  3. 2005 - 2,551 persons charged

Bajan law enforcement agencies like RBPF made 91% less drug charges in 2007 compared with 2005! If this trend continues, there will be approximately 80 charges in 2008, followed by 25 in 2009!

Barbados is party to the 1961 UN Single Convention as amended by the 1972 Protocol, the 1971 UN Convention on Psychotropic Substances, and the 1988 UN Drug Convention. Barbados has signed, but not ratified, the Inter-American Convention against Corruption, and is a party to the Inter-American Firearms Convention. Barbados has not signed the Inter-American Convention on Mutual Assistance in Criminal Matters or the Inter-American Convention on Extradition. The Mutual Assistance in Criminal Matters Act allows Barbados to provide mutual legal assistance to countries with which it has a bilateral mutual legal assistance treaty, Commonwealth countries, and states-parties to the 1988 UN Drug
Convention. Barbados has an asset-sharing agreement with Canada. Barbados has signed but has not yet ratified the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime and its three protocols and the UN Convention against Corruption.
Editors note: Is our Bajan government serious about fighting drug trafficking? “Barbados has signed but has not yet ratified the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime and its three protocols and the UN Convention against Corruption.”
They have also “not ratified, the Inter-American Convention against Corruption”.
Why is the Barbados Government not willing to take decisive steps to combat corruption?

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Source for the numbers of drug charges - Snippet from The (US) Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, International Narcotics Control Strategy Report -2007. (Click on image to read entire pdf)


All images, except for my bar chart and the RBPF logo, are from openstockphotography.org

Related: SignOnSanDiego.com: Ex-Mexico gov. convicted on drug charges, gets 36 years!